What Kind Of Paperwork Is Needed For Starting A Construction Project? Find Out Here

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Before you start a construction project, there are certain documents that you must always have completed and ready to go. Having all the paperwork completed and agreed to by both parties ensures that there are fewer disagreements once the project actually starts. 

 Whether you’re running a construction business or you’ve hired someone to work on a project on your land, here are some documents that you should always have figured out before any work takes place.

 

Construction Agreement

This is the main document that sets out the terms of the agreement between the construction company and the owner of the property they will be working on. This agreement protects both parties involved and provides a framework that everyone can refer to in case of disputes. With a construction contract, everyone involved in a construction project is protected, both financially and legally. 

The agreement is only one part of the many documents that make up a complete contract bundle, so it’s not the only piece of paperwork you’ll encounter before you can get started with a project.

 

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Scope of Work

The scope of work will clearly and precisely define what work is to be performed as part of the construction project. It ensures that the landowner gets what he paid for and that the construction company isn’t made to complete tasks that were not part of the contractual agreement. 

The scope contains everything from surface-level information – an overview of the project – to more detailed deliverables and technical details. This includes everything from determining whether land surveyors need to be hired, to specific methods that will be followed as part of the job. It may also include the project timeline, though this may also be a separate document of its own.

Construction Timeline

If a scope of work includes the construction timeline, it is likely merely an overview. Ideally, you should also include a separate, detailed timeline as part of the contract paperwork.

Having a clear timeline for when the project is meant to be completed means that property owners will have recourse should construction run over time. Additionally, the timeline helps contractors plan work – they have a clear idea of what work must be completed when, which means they can plan ahead of time to ensure that things are on schedule.

Depending on the type of contract that has been agreed to and the relationship between the contractor and the landowner, a construction timeline can also be a dynamic document that is updated in real-time. This allows contractors some wiggle room in the case of unavoidable delays, such as freak weather conditions and other such situations.

 

lmml Construction Project

 

Drawings

No construction contract is complete without two sets of drawings – the blueprints and the as-built drawings.

The blueprints are usually the construction plans submitted prior to the start of the project, on the basis of which the property owner gives their go-ahead. On the other hand, as-built drawings are drawings that compare and contrast the design agreed upon and the final specifications. It’s an acknowledgment of the fact that no construction project will ever go perfectly to plan and these documents are usually submitted at the end of the project.

The as-built drawings give the property owner a clear idea of what, precisely, the completed project entails. It ensures that the contracting party is not misled by the initial blueprints, which may have been adjusted during the course of the project.

General and Specific Conditions

The General Conditions set out the rights and responsibilities of each party involved in the contract: the contractor and the property owner. For example, it will determine who bears the pre-development fees and pays for utilities that construction crews will utilize.

The Special Condition is an extension of the General Conditions section. It sets out any special responsibilities that are unique to a given project and may not be covered in a stock General Conditions document.

These are only a few of the types of paperwork that you must have in order before work can start on a construction project. Other documents that are often required include details of insurance coverage, cost estimates for the project that include an itemized breakdown of costs, and more. 

Additionally, if the construction project is a commercial one, other documents may be required as well, especially if there is a bidding process involved prior to the contract being agreed to. Whatever the case, it’s essential to make sure that all the paperwork you need is readily available, as it protects both parties and reduces the risk of long, drawn-out disagreements should something go wrong during the project.

Before you start a construction project, there are certain documents that you must always have completed and ready to go. Having all the paperwork completed and agreed to by both parties ensures that there are fewer disagreements once the project actually starts. 

 Whether you’re running a construction business or you’ve hired someone to work on a project on your land, here are some documents that you should always have figured out before any work takes place.

 

lkmlmk Construction Project

Construction Agreement

This is the main document that sets out the terms of the agreement between the construction company and the owner of the property they will be working on. This agreement protects both parties involved and provides a framework that everyone can refer to in case of disputes. With a construction contract, everyone involved in a construction project is protected, both financially and legally. 

The agreement is only one part of the many documents that make up a complete contract bundle, so it’s not the only piece of paperwork you’ll encounter before you can get started with a project.

Scope of Work

The scope of work will clearly and precisely define what work is to be performed as part of the construction project. It ensures that the landowner gets what he paid for and that the construction company isn’t made to complete tasks that were not part of the contractual agreement. 

The scope contains everything from surface-level information – an overview of the project – to more detailed deliverables and technical details. This includes everything from determining whether land surveyors need to be hired, to specific methods that will be followed as part of the job. It may also include the project timeline, though this may also be a separate document of its own.

Construction Timeline

If a scope of work includes the construction timeline, it is likely merely an overview. Ideally, you should also include a separate, detailed timeline as part of the contract paperwork.

Having a clear timeline for when the project is meant to be completed means that property owners will have recourse should construction run over time. Additionally, the timeline helps contractors plan work – they have a clear idea of what work must be completed when, which means they can plan ahead of time to ensure that things are on schedule.

Depending on the type of contract that has been agreed to and the relationship between the contractor and the landowner, a construction timeline can also be a dynamic document that is updated in real-time. This allows contractors some wiggle room in the case of unavoidable delays, such as freak weather conditions and other such situations.

Drawings

No construction contract is complete without two sets of drawings – the blueprints and the as-built drawings.

The blueprints are usually the construction plans submitted prior to the start of the project, on the basis of which the property owner gives their go-ahead. On the other hand, as-built drawings are drawings that compare and contrast the design agreed upon and the final specifications. It’s an acknowledgment of the fact that no construction project will ever go perfectly to plan and these documents are usually submitted at the end of the project.

The as-built drawings give the property owner a clear idea of what, precisely, the completed project entails. It ensures that the contracting party is not misled by the initial blueprints, which may have been adjusted during the course of the project.

 

What Kind Of Paperwork Is Needed For Starting A Construction Project? Find Out Here

 

General and Specific Conditions

The General Conditions set out the rights and responsibilities of each party involved in the contract: the contractor and the property owner. For example, it will determine who bears the pre-development fees and pays for utilities that construction crews will utilize.

The Special Condition is an extension of the General Conditions section. It sets out any special responsibilities that are unique to a given project and may not be covered in a stock General Conditions document.

These are only a few of the types of paperwork that you must have in order before work can start on a construction project. Other documents that are often required include details of insurance coverage, cost estimates for the project that include an itemized breakdown of costs, and more. 

Additionally, if the construction project is a commercial one, other documents may be required as well, especially if there is a bidding process involved prior to the contract being agreed to. Whatever the case, it’s essential to make sure that all the paperwork you need is readily available, as it protects both parties and reduces the risk of long, drawn-out disagreements should something go wrong during the project.

 

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